. . . and after a prolonged delay. . . Zero to Sixty continues. . .

blackboard chalk chalkboard concept
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

30.  Working as an Educational Assistant. I ‘fell’ into this job. And I loved it. I had to have — because it sure didn’t pay a lot. I worked primarily with special needs kids and it gave me a lot of pride and satisfaction to help them learn and thrive and grow.

31.  Going to a writer’s retreat for the first time. It was scary and exhilarating.  I am a writer!

32.  Years and years and years ago starting an environmentally friendly products business with a friend. We made re-usable coffee filters, produce bags and cleaning supplies. It didn’t last — we were too early on the scene. But, I still have some of those filters and produce bags!

33.  This is a joint one. Tim and I making the decision to move to Bon Accord from the city. Buying our big, beautiful house and making it our home. I’ve never regretted that decision. I am always happiest when I am there.

34.  Once I spent a week by myself at a friend’s of my sister’s cottage in Ontario.
I was going through some stuff and just needed a break. It was a wonderful, liberating time. All that solitude was seriously good for my soul.

35.  I won the Harlequin Romance Write Us A Romance contest back in the late eighties. I did it as a whim — had never read an HR novel — but thought, what the hey? how hard can it be? Well, once I started I realized it wasn’t that easy. I was so surprised and honoured that I won. That’s as far as it went though — it’s just not my thing.

Day 82 – Purge the Plastic

This past weekend we took in our recyclables to the recycling station a few blocks away. I have been recycling for years. It can get to be tiresome – all that rinsing, sorting and storing, but it’s become such a habit that I’d feel guilty if I didn’t.

For the last little while I’ve really been focused on how much plastic we use. Not just personally, but collectively.

I understand that plastic has its uses and that it serves some very good purposes and that, without it, certain aspects of modern life would not be possible.

But, do we really need to individually wrap cucumbers and packages of cookies and crackers? Are little individual plastic encased pieces of cheese truly an advancement we can’t live without?

When I go grocery shopping I’m extremely conscious and picky about what I buy and how it’s packaged. If something comes in a cello-wrapped box and its contents are in turn cello-or-plastic wrapped – it ain’t ever going in my cart.

When I buy produce I rarely use those plastic produce bags. And if I do, I bring ones that I’m reusing or I use the cloth ones I bought especially for that use.

It is annoying to the cashiers, I’ve noticed, when they have to pick up my lettuce or celery and it’s not in a bag, and when they attempt to stick it in a bag and I stop them they get even more testy. I had one of them ask me one time if I wasn’t concerned about germs. I would be, I said, if I wasn’t going to wash everything once I got it home. She just glared at me.

The truth is we’ve become so tricked into thinking that covering our food in plastic is somehow preventing us from coming in contact with germs and dirt and bacteria. The only reason that plastic is there is to ensure less spoilage losses for growers, transporters and retailers.

Think about it – when summer comes and we all flock to farmer’s markets we’re not looking to buy fruits and veggies that are all wrapped in plastic,  are we?  No.  We want unwrapped produce that we can pick up, look at, smell and even taste. We bring our own bags and we happily pack our purchases into them. Why should shopping at a grocery store be any different?

The amount of plastic pollution in our world is staggering. It is a blight on the landscape and it’s poisoning our oceans, rivers and seas. The companies producing all this plastic are doing little to nothing to provide solutions to dealing with the waste their industry produces. Individuals and small concerned groups are trying to effect change, but in reality their efforts are miniscule in comparison to the problem.

A while ago I contacted Costco and asked them to reconsider how they send out their consumer magazine and flyers. Use a paper wrapper, I suggested, instead of encasing it in plastic. Costco, supposedly prides itself on how they contribute to environmental concerns. I have yet to receive a response.

Just yesterday, I sent an email to a clothing manufacturer. J.a.c.h.s Girlfriend, out of New York. I thanked them for making a very nice article of clothing, but I also thanked them for not attaching the extra button in a tiny plastic bag on a tiny plastic string. Instead, they sewed it to the washing instructions tag. Awesome.

Every little thing.

The next time you go shopping, do the world a favour, and send a message to manufacturers and distributors,  leave the plastic behind.

some thoughts. . .

I try, these days, to live as environmentally, and globally conscious as I possibly can.  I think — a lot — about things before I buy them.  How much energy will they use?  How and where were they made?  Are they sustainable?  How much garbage will I be contributing to the landfill when I’m done with said item?  Can that garbage be gotten rid of here or will it wind up clogging some third world country’s landscape?  Will it be dumped in our oceans?  The list of questions I can ask myself is absurd.

Thirty years ago I would not have been asking myself such questions.  Thirty years ago it was all about self-gratification and never a thought to the impact my actions might have on the world.  Now, I know, from having taken a sociology and psychology course or two, that this introspective thinking I currently engage in is a natural progression.  As I grow older, I grow more contemplative, have greater awareness of the impact of my existence and begin to question the ‘why’ of life.  I think this makes me a much more interesting person than I was thirty years ago, but as I age and as I continue on this path of responsible living I sometimes wonder if I’m going to turn in to that old woman we’ve all seen with the yard full of bleach-bottle whirligigs, painted rocks and tin can mobiles hanging from the branches of the trees in her yard.  Will I do my dishes in old dish pan and then carry the water out to pour on my garden?  (Wait a minute!  I’ve already contemplated doing that!)  Surely that’s not a bad thing?  Why then is it that I feel rather geeky admitting that I would do that?  Saving water is something we should all take very seriously.  And yet. . .

isn’t the water we’re using the same water the planet’s had for millenia?  I’ve heard the world doesn’t ever create more water, it just constantly recycles what there is.  So, how can we be running out?  Especially with the glaciers, icebergs and polar ice-caps melting at the rate they are.  We’re more in danger of being flooded out than dried out, I’d think. 

Yes, I’m being facetious.  I’m really quite worried about our water supply and I do all sorts of things that I won’t bother getting into in order to save as much water as possible in my daily life. 

Now, I’m going to talk about something else that I think is quite important.  Deodorant.  Yes, that’s right, deodorant.  I think deodorant is probably one of mankind’s greatest inventions.  But. . . about 2 years ago I started looking for alternatives to the traditional deodorants I’ve been using since I was a kid.  No more Alzheimer causing deodorants for me!  I’ve tried quite a few different ones but nothing ever really truly measured up to what I was used to.  One thing I’m really conscious of is body odour, and I would be mortified to think I stink.  Anyway, I’ve found this great product from a company called Saje.  It’s called Natural Wellness Crystal Fresh Deodorant.  And it really works!  The ingredients in this deodorant are:  Liquid mineral salts, and essential oils.  The one I’m using right now has lavender, sandalwood and patchouli.  The company is based in Delta, BC, so I even feel great about supporting a product made in Canada.  Even greater is the fact that they don’t overpackage.  There are no extra boxes, plastic wrap or bags to throw away after you’ve made your purchase.  You simply take your bottle or tube or what have you, pay for it and away you go.  I love it; it’s simplicity and value and something that is good for you. 

I just wanted to share all that with you.  And I want you to try Saje deodorant.  Trust me, you’ll like it.

Here’s a link to their site:  http://www.saje.ca

The Commercialization of Green Consumerism

Out for my walk this morning in the fog with Heather.  We have great talks on these early morning jaunts and this morning we got onto the topic of green lifestyles.  It all started with my relating to her a story I’d heard the night before about young people overwhelmed by their debt load after getting out of school and some of the creative ways in which they’re solving their problems.  We segued into how much affluence we have in this country and that we have absolutely no idea of what it means to ‘make do’.  Unlike, say someone in the Dominican making $3.00 a day.  To us, making do is deciding to eat lunch at McDonald’s instead of Boston Pizza.  Tough decision!

Anyway, this got me going on how living green has become the next big growth industry.  Up til now we’ve all been pressured into buying designer clothes, fancy houses, bigger, bigger and bigger flat screen tv’s, new cars, vacation properties — the list just goes on forever.  Now, however, we are being pressured into living green, but living green expensively.  What is, essentially, supposed to be a way of living your life simpler, less expensively and with minimal impact on the environment, has become just one more way for us to live in competition with one another.

For instance, you’re only a cool ‘greenie’ if you pitch your current household linens and buy 100% bamboo, hemp or organic cotton.  Anyone seen the price of a set of bamboo sheets?  Try $400.00 a pop!  A t-shirt made of 100% certified organic, non-rainforest harvested hemp?  A mere $100.00.  Or what about retrofitting your house with solar panels, a solar powered generator, switching to geo-thermal heat instead of good old coal or water generated electricity?  Upwards of $50,000.00 (and that’s only if you live in an area where something like geo-thermal options are feasible).

Then there are vehicles — switching to a hybrid sounds like a smart, sensible, responsible idea, until you start looking into them.  Cost of these vehicles is coming down somewhat, but have you checked into repair costs?  Ouch!  And, load up a family of 4, a few large suitcases, the dog, some camping gear and head out for the back country for some nice fresh air and discover just how economical and comfortable these vehicles aren’t.  Maybe, while you’re away you can have some home renovations taken care of.  How about installing Fair Trade 100% organic bamboo or cork flooring harvested by hand from naturally sustainable forests?  Compare the costs to North American hardwood made from trees raped from our forests, then manufactured in our embarrassingly modern and technologically advanced mills.  The bamboo or cork is only about 3 times the cost, but hey the investment in feeling good about doing something ‘green’ will be more than worth it.

Going natural, it seems, has become just one more way for somebody else to get rich off everybody else’s guilt.  For years I’ve been trying to live a simpler, greener life and I’ve managed without having to spend a ton of money to do it.  It’s all about changing the way you think, not about how you spend your money.

I recycle everything that I can, and as a result when I shop, I shop with recycling in mind.  I don’t buy over packaged goods so that I don’t have a mound of plastic to send to the recycling depot.  I re-purpose things — meaning once an old t-shirt is too grungy to wear I turn it into rags.  We are renovating, and we are doing as much of the work ourselves as we can, we reuse as much of the old stuff as we can and we try to incorporate environmentally friendly products whenever and wherever we can.  But, our retaining wall is still made from pressure-treated timbers and the new eavestroughing is PVC, not artisan-made tin or copper.

It really annoys me that something so simple that could have such an impact on our world and people’s lives is being exploited so that someone else can get rich.  And you just know that the marketing geniuses and corporation executives behind the push to get you to ‘go green’ aren’t driving around in Smart Cars, eating 100% organically grown Tofu burgers, and that they’re not living in some mud hut somewhere with nothing but the skins of animals to wear.

Seriously, people, smarten up.  Live green, but for god’s sake, do it without buying into the hype.